Highlights from the Blogroll… and Beyond

Nick Norelli is hosting on his blog the 2008 Trinity Blogging Summit, which features a number of excellent essays on this most important subject. (I’m delighted, of course, that it didn’t just become an outlet for pernicious perichoreting, in the end.) Both Mike Aubreyand myself had hoped to contribute to the 2008 TBS, but we didn’t complete our respective essays in time for the February 29 deadline. I know Mike is still working on his, however; and if I can finish my essay on “Liturgy’s trinitarian reading of the Bible in the Service of the Feast of Theophany” by next Monday, I certainly will submit it to Nick for posting.As many others have noted, the Biblical Studies Carnival XXVII is now available at Kevin Wilson’s blog, Blue Cord. I should like to note that, while I am pleased that his stop at the hermeneutics booth resulted in a link to one of my posts on Apostolic exegesis, I am also greatly distraught that in his very next stop at the tent of the guild of Biblical scholars, he picked up a post by one Alan Lenzi issuing a call for membership standards at SBLthis, of course, precisely as I’m processing my own membership in that learned society! Alas, I knew that the conspiracy to keep me out of SBL would not remain under wraps for long. ;-)

The divine Fleming Rutledge, one of the finest preachers of our generation, has posted a masterful indictment of P. C. readings of the Classics. It is apparently P.C. to express that one feels compassion for the likes of Emily Brontë and Jane Austen on account of “lamentable restrictions in 19th century women’s lives,” but the divine Fleming cannot agree: “[S]hould Emily Brontë on her dismal moor be the object of our compassion, or our dumbstruck awe?” In the end, by feeling sorry for these giants, we only perpetuate quite sexist approaches to their lives and works.

The amazing John Hobbins has posted quite the thought-provoking post on the question of just how well did St Jerome know Hebrew. Since I have conclusively proved earlier in this blog that St Jerome rocks, no further arguments to this effect are necessary; but let me tell you, reading John’s excellent piece can’t hurt!

Jim West (tagged by Chris Brady) has decided to respond to yet another vile and foul meme, this time elucidating for us all why exactly it is he blogs. I find answers a & 2 to be quite clear and satisfactory, but answer 3 seems, well, a bit vague. “I want to,” says he. Well yes, Jim, but why do you want to? Here we are inexplicably met with silence. Thankfully, and in spite of Jim’s seeming reluctance to flesh out his rather laconic response, I have been able to find a most enlightening illustration that fully explains the real reason behind Jim’s drive to blog:

Jim West at home, in front of his computer.
(And speaking of Jim West and Chris Brady, I learned yesterday that the latter had interviewed the former in April 2007 as the first in Targuman‘s “Bibliopodcast” series. It was a fascinating interview; I feel like I need to listen to it again and take notes! I know not, however, why the “Bibliopodcasts” have gone awry so soon; for his third (!) installment, Brady has chosen to interview the Rev Mr Tilling, a well-known Wrightianist and textbook example of why some sensible people just can’t believe there is a just and loving God. At least it was not a wholly wasted 27:30 minutes: I certainly did learn, for instance, that I cannot leave any of my original research around the prying eyes of Gordon Fee!)

And last but not least, those who enjoy the use of folk and contemporary music styles in the cultic gatherings of their faith communities will undoubtedly also greet with much delight this catchy praise song, addressed to one called “powerful sovereign lord.”

2 responses to “Highlights from the Blogroll… and Beyond

  1. Well, Monday is the beginning of Lent, and things usually get a bit busy and complicated from that point on. ;-) We shall see!

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